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This Maintains Unemployment Benefits?

Application form for Unemployment benefits

In this economy, a familiar form

Maintaining unemployment benefits is as easy as dialing a phone number, it would seem.  I wish I could tell you how many times I’ve answered the phone at my business, only to hear the person on the other end methodically ask me if we’re hiring.  Regardless of what I say, an overwhelming majority of those calls ends quickly as they hang up.  Now bear in mind, the caller has no idea if I am a hiring authority.  If they call in May and the answer happens to be yes, I can count on one hand how many have maintained the call long enough for me to give details.  It wasn’t long before such calls really began to annoy me.

The frequency picked up as the recession worsened.  Of course, as employment levels suffer, unemployment benefit claims rise.  It then occurred to me that those calls were not sincere attempts to gain employment at my establishment, but rather they were required activity in order to maintain their state unemployment benefits.  Calling me, asking that question, then hanging up constituted a job search, which is the key requirement to receiving the weekly check from the state.

Like every business, I pay taxes to the state.  Part of that sum is put aside by the state of Oregon into an employment account.  My contribution is specified and when someone becomes involuntarily unemployed and they file for benefits, my account is charged if my business was one of the last three to employ them.  That is to say, should I terminate someone who then goes on to get another job somewhere else and they then get laid off there, when they file for unemployment my account is charged.  Due to extensions granted by the state, this can go on for a very long time as long as that person is “looking for work.”  A five second call to me, or to any business that answers the phone, satisfies this requirement.

Although I firmly believe that safety nets of some kind need to exist, I resent that the state behemoth can be so lax in knowing or understanding how so many can manipulate them into free money at no cost, other than to businesses.  Being that I typically employ a younger person, it makes sense to me that a 23 year old just out of a job would be tempted to receive a weekly pay check from the state in return for nothing more than a brief phone call.  Especially when that can go on indefinitely.  Why work when a check just shows up in the mail every week?

Clearly, such a scenario only burdens the private sector even more and certainly does nothing to help that individual in the long run.  A sense of entitlement with no effort sets in, and that can have long term, damaging results to our state and country.  Although I’m unsure how to fix this specifically, I’d start by perhaps requiring that job search efforts be more substantial and that anyone receiving unemployment benefits needs to be required to work for the state in some capacity.  That seems fair and is a good way to at least decrease the burden on the private sector.

I’m amazed at the clarity I gained from taking so many five second calls

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Obamacare Waivers: I’ll say

national health care bill disastrous effectsObamaCare:  how government mandate can turn good intentions into abominations.

In my small business, offering perks to my employees is next to impossible.  On the top of my wish list would be the opportunity to offer them health insurance.  Many would say that as of recently, that became a possibility.  That is sadly not so.  I consider President Obama’s national healthcare bill to be perhaps the very worst piece of legislation passed in our country in my lifetime.

Health insurance and health care are two different things.  And the president’s effort to extend the former to everyone has in turn driven up it’s cost while reducing the quality of the latter.  Because providing opportunity through the free market runs contrary to them, this is a classic example of the liberal mindset of instead wanting to evenly spread misery across a population in the name of fairness.

Cost of healthcare is the issue here.  What has been termed Obamacare doesn’t lower the cost of providing the health care. Rather, it expands the pool of those who drive up the costs and extends to the government the power to oversee it. And we all know the government doesn’t ever do things within budget.

How is forcing my employees to buy insurance they can’t afford helping them? How will fining them when they don’t buy it help? Why does a family of 4 making $88,200 a year need a government subsidy for their health insurance? Why do registered sex offenders need access to Viagra on the public dime? And I won’t even go into the publicly funded abortion issue for fear of smashing this keyboard.

I know the attitudes when debating topics such as this are partisan to a fault. I’m guilty as anyone.  But to anyone who has ever been passionate about government spending, this ponzi scheme should enrage them. That, and the overt power grab in the assuming of 1/6 of our economy while mimicking the Eruo social democracies does me.

If we really want to make health insurance more affordable to my employees, as I do, then this isn’t the way. Rather, it’s the work of blatant ideologues. There are more affordable, and I’d say effective, things we could try first (say, eliminating state boundaries for the insurance market.  Or tort reform, maybe.) They are not interested in those things. They don’t want them getting in the way of their frightening agenda.

This is Big Brother, but in real life.  Ignorance, or a complete rejection of the American way, are the only reasons anyone would believe him when he says he’s got good intentions.

Small Business Equity? No loans for you!

The lending market:  the ins and outs are complex, but I do know that I can’t get an equity loan for my business.  

As I write this, we are two days away, supposedly, to the deadline when our nation must raise our debt limit or default on our debt.  Those last four words are nothing more than a ridiculous scare tactic.  Avoiding default is done by making interest payments on debt, which can be done with relative ease regardless of what happens.  Now that’s not saying we shouldn’t raise the debt limit anyways, but I bring this up only to say that scare tactic or not, markets, including lending markets, can and will react to whatever action takes place as the network of participants decipher the situation in their own ways.

business lending stalled, unavailability of equity loans

And everyday, for small businesses

This brings me to my main point, which is far from strictly related to the current fiscal issue making the headlines.  Small businesses all over the country, who are charged with maintaining the lion’s share of private sector employment, are finding it next to impossible to get a business loan.  The reasons are many, but they all center around the uncertainty swirling around our country’s economy and recently imposed federal regulations on what exactly a bank’s balance sheet is supposed to look like.  What is certain, and I speak from direct experience as a small business owner, is that the unavailability of capital makes it next to impossible for businesses to expand or improve in any way, and that makes employment and the economy as a whole unlikely to improve any time soon.

I am lucky enough to own the building in which I do business.  Based on current commercial real estate estimates, I have in the neighborhood of $650-750 thousand dollars of equity in that building.  (Sadly, based on figures obtained in 2007, that number would be closer to $900k-$1million.  Oh if only I knew then what I know now.)  However, despite having such an asset on which to secure a loan, I have been turned down repeatedly by many banks on my application to tap some of that equity for capital improvements in the building and business.  Having proof of being able to cash flow the required payments on such a loan has proven worthless.

Our floors need to be redone.  Our coolers need to be updated.  Our products need to be refined.  All of these things would make us more competitive in the local market and further able to offer jobs to the community.  Without these things getting done, my company stands on shakier ground when it comes to our immediate survival and there lingers the possibility that my employees will enter the unemployment line, worsening the already dire economic situation.  And their own lives, of course.

Why is this lending market so bad?  There are many reasons.  Complex ones, too.  But they all have to do with uncertainty and inconsistent regulation.  Will our country default on it’s debt?  Are taxes going to increase?  Will we have to play by new rules imposed on us?  What are a banks balance sheets supposed to look like exactly?  Why make business loans to local communities when a bank can make more money trading securities?

The availability of capital to the credit worthy is paramount to a healthy business environment.  A healthy business environment is paramount to a healthy employment rate.  A healthy employment rate is paramount to a healthy economy.  A healthy economy is paramount to a healthy quality of life for our country’s citizens.  The best way for our government to iron this out is to eliminate the uncertainty of it’s fiscal agenda and be clear and consistent in any regulations they make on a lending market.  Until that happens, and I don’t see it happening under this President and this Congress, I’m going to have to keep looking at my beat up floors and hoping that I can hold on long enough for relief to eventually come.  And the next chance of that is most likely the fall of 2012.

You Were Abused, too??

Abuse, much to my surprise, seems to be everywhere.  At one point a few years ago I was employer to 5 people, a third of my staff, who confided to me that an immediate family member had sexually or physically abused them when they were young.  I was suddenly a confidant in a position of authority, and as I heard each of these confessions privately, unexpectedly, one at a time, I felt dumbfounded.  Then, sadness, with a sense of undefined responsibility.  I also gave repeated thanks for my own good fortune.

What was I supposed to do with this information?  I’m good at lending an ear, and giving a hug, but then what?  Those things won’t erase the scars these people are carrying.  They won’t unfetter them of the burden of shame and allow them to soar off into the future.  I think the worst part of gaining the confidence of these poor victims who I’d grown to like so much, was also the best part as it related to me, personally.  That is that the concept of being victimized by a family member is totally and completely alien to me.  I simply couldn’t relate and therefore couldn’t offer any sound advice.  I felt helpless then, and I feel helpless now, as I know that there are more unlucky souls like them all around me.

The broken or dysfunctional family is in my estimation one of the gravest threats to our fine country.  How can future generations be given the foundation they need when so many of their parents didn’t receive such a thing?  It is much easier to let down your own children when you yourself were let down by the people charged with giving you unconditional, safe, love.

As I contemplate this topic, I don’t feel as if I’ll ever know how to handle such a thing.  Which is frustrating, because it’s so easy to spot bad propagating bad.  It’s all around me every day, frankly.  I feel sad to think of what these people who confided this horror to me might be like, what they might be accomplishing, if it weren’t for the ugly, evil acts of their brothers, fathers, or step fathers.  We will never know.

All I do know is that the only course of action I feel as though I can take to address this terrible phenomenon is to thank God every day that I was born into such a miracle of a family and wish that others might be as fortunate as I am.  Maybe doing so will lead to a snowball effect of some kind.  Others who share my blessing should join in.

For more information on adults abused as children please click here.